When Do You Need Chimney Cleaning Mclean?

Need your chimney cleaned? You can’t put it off forever. Leaving a chimney and chimney flue filthy greatly increases your chances of fires. Clean chimneys do not catch fire. It’s as simple as that. How do you know when it’s time for Chimney Cleaning Mclean?

Fires Getting Smokier

If you are using the same type and amount of wood but it’s producing more and more smoke, this usually means that the smoke is not going up the chimney but out into your home. Do not have any more fires in the fireplace until the chimney and chimney flue is inspected and cleaned.

If You Mostly Use Pine

Pine wood smells good and catches quickly but produces the most ash and creosote build-up in chimneys than any other types of wood. If your wood fires are predominately made up of pine, then you need an inspection every spring or summer. You may need to get a chimney cleaning as frequently. If possible, try to limit or eliminate the use of pine in your fireplace.

Check Fireplace Dampener

Feel for a draft coming down the chimney. If there is one, open a window in the room where the fireplace is located. This helps stops the draft. Put on work goggles and a face mask so you do not breathe in the ash and creosote. Shine a flashlight up the smoke chamber or dampener. If it’s coated with gunk and grey, brown or black ash, it’s time for a cleaning. If you cannot determine how thick the gunk is, get a fireplace poker and scrape off a layer. If the layer is more than a quarter inch thick, this is an emergency. Do not use the fireplace again until it has been cleaned.

How About if I Don’t Use the Fireplace Often?

Even if you do not use your fireplace at all or if you use it only occasionally, you should get your chimney inspected at least once a year. It’s not only creosote and ash that build up in chimneys. Birds and small animals like to make nests in chimneys. Unfortunately, this nesting material is highly flammable and can cause a fire.

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